Tag: Learning Experiences

Thinking about thinking

So how to translate different conceptions of the English verb “to think” into Chinese? I don’t claim to have entirely resolved it, but this is how I, well, think about it.

Tone-deaf

One of the most important tasks in becoming truly fluent in a language is to pronounce its sounds properly.

Getting Started

Learning Chinese might end up being the most difficult and challenging thing I’ve ever done. I’ve been at it a year now and I speak Chinese like a … well, a one year old.

The holiday season in Taiwan

In this piece I share some thoughts on Christmas (圣诞节 Shèngdànjié) and New Year’s (新年xīnnián) in Taiwan.

Act natural

In this article I want to discuss several aspects of Chinese sentence construction that don’t always come naturally to English-speaking students.

Leading to frustration

They are 使得(shǐde), 讓(ràng) and 令(lìng). They all seem to mean “lead to,” “induce,” “bring about.”

Speech of parts

But in Chinese, apparently, these components fall into two categories, with different words.

In Chinese, it’s never relative

One of the workhorse parts of speech in English and in most European languages is the relative pronoun. These include that, when, which, who/whom/whose, where and a few other less frequently used ones. Usually they

How to receive things in Chinese: 收(shōu)vs. 受(shòu)

In English among many other things one can “receive” a piece of mail, and one can “receive” good or bad emotional news. In each case, the verb is “to receive,” and we think of those

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